15. Last work session
tinvn303
Today:
    Project work session

5/8 (final exam session):
   Project demos
     Reports due
        (inc. grad student prototype evaluation section)


Today

1. Each team updates the class:
a. What progress has most  
recently been made on the project.
b. Current status of the project.
c. Issues and questions that
need to be resolved.
d. What you plan to do on the
project in time for next class.

2. Project work session

3. Each team emails us
   about today with what was

discussed,
accomplished
,
remains unresolved, and
what is planned next.

14. Demo checkpoint & project work day
tinvn303
Today:

Project checkpoint:
      demos of prototype versions

Project work session

5/1 (last class session):
Project work session

5/8 (final exam session):
Project presentations
     Report due
     Grad students:
        Evaluation report due

        May be a section or appendix of general report


Questions you might be asked today:

a. What progress has most recently been made?

b. What is the current status of the project?

c. What issues and questions need to be resolved?

d. What do you plan to do by next class?


Each team emails us about today:
What was


discussed
accomplished

remains unresolved
what is planned next

13. Project work, with life cycle models
tinvn303
Today and 4/23:
Project checkpoint:
   Pick either date to demo a prototype version
Project work session

5/1 and 5/8 (last class and final exam period):
Pick either date to present/demo your project
      Which date do you choose?
Project work session

5/8 (final exam session):
Grad student prototype evaluation report due


Today
Some remarks on life cycle models
Each team updates the class:
  a. What progress has most  
recently been made on the project.
b. Current status of the project.
c. Issues and questions that
need to be resolved.
d. What you plan to do on the
project in time for next class.

Project work session

Each team emails us
   about today with what was

discussed,
accomplished
,
remains unresolved, and
what is planned next.


---------------------------------
Notes on life cycle models

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12. Project work, with scheduling
tinvn303

Schedule for remainder of semester

4/10:
   Today (details below)

4/17 and 4/23:
   Project checkpoint:
       Pick either date to demo a prototype version
           Which date do you choose?
   Project work session

5/1 and 5/8 (last class and final exam period):
   Pick either date to present/demo your project
          Which date do you choose?
   Project work session

5/8 (final exam session):
   Grad student prototype evaluation report due


Today
   Some remarks on project scheduling
  Each team updates the class:
      a. What progress has most  
  recently been made on the project.
    b. Current status of the project.
    c. Issues and questions that
 need to be resolved.\
    d. What you plan to do on the
project in time for next class.

Project work session

Each team emails us
   about today with what was

discussed,
accomplished
,
remains unresolved, and
what is planned next.


Notes on Gantt and PERT Diagrams


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11. Project work, with testing
tinvn303

Plan for today's meeting

1) Some remarks on testing related issues

2) Each team will update the class
in an informal presentation
(no need for polished slides),
using the following outline:
a. What progress has most
recently been made on the project.
b. Current status of the project.
c. Issues and questions that
need to be resolved.
d. What you plan to do on the
project in time for next class.
(This may change, but is a
starting point.)


3) Project work session

4) Each team emails me
about today with what was

discussed,
accomplished
,
remains unresolved, and
what is planned next.

=================================


Groups should at this point be

    planning how to test the prototype

    testing the prototype

        (or parts of it, as appropriate)

But how?

    Here are some suggestions:

these slides are slides from the
Stanford University

d.school bootcamp bootleg
resource (thanks, d.school!)

Please take notes on each slide
as to how to apply them
to your project or parts of your project

     I will check them afterwards!

Here are the bootcamp bootleg slides...


testmode

2camerastudy

3interviewprep

4interviewforempathy

5shareandcapture

6empathymap

7compositecharacter


10. Project work, with note on epic software project failures
tinvn303
Announcement: The paper should use the same structure as the paper from last semester. The length should be sufficient to properly discuss your project.

Plan for today's meeting

1) A few remarks on epic software project failures

2) Each team will update the class
in an informal presentation
(no need for polished slides),
using the following outline:
a. What progress has most
recently been made on the project.
b. Current status of the project.
c. Issues and questions that
need to be resolved.
d. What you plan to do on the
project in time for next class.

3) Project work session

4) EACH TEAM EMAILS ME WITH
WHAT WAS DISCUSSED,
ACCOMPLISHED,
AND/OR REMAINS AN
UNRESOLVED PROBLEM
DURING THE WORK SESSION

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9. Project work, with note on specifications
tinvn303
Plan for today's meeting

1) A few remarks on specifications.

2) Each team will update the class
in an informal presentation
(no need for polished slides),
using the following outline:
   a. What progress has most
       recently been made on the project.
   b. Current status of the project.
   c. Issues and questions that
       need to be resolved.
   d. What you plan to do on the
       project in time for next class.

3) Project work session

4) EACH TEAM EMAILS ME WITH
    WHAT WAS DISCUSSED,
    ACCOMPLISHED,
    AND/OR REMAINS AN
    UNRESOLVED PROBLEM
    DURING THE WORK SESSION
------------------------------------

First, consider this anecdote about specifications!
-----------------------------------------
From: David Schiller [dschiller@juno.com] Mon 10/4/1999 2:22 PM

Specs Live Forever . . .

The US Standard railroad gauge (distance between rails) is 4 feet,
8.5inches. That's an exceedingly odd number.
Why was that gauge used? Because that's the way they built them in
England, and the US railroads were built by English expatriates.
Why did the English people build them like that? Because the first
rail lines were built by the same people who built the pre-railroad
tramways, and that's the gauge they used.
Why did "they" use that gauge then? Because the people who built the
tramways used the same jigs and tools that they used for building
wagons, which used that wheel spacing. Okay! Why did the wagons use
that odd wheel spacing?
Well, if they tried to use any other spacing the wagons would break on
some of the old, long distance roads, because that's the spacing of
the old wheel ruts. So who built these old rutted roads?
The first long distance roads in Europe were built by Imperial Rome
for the benefit of their legions. The roads have been used ever
since. And the ruts? The initial ruts, which everyone else had to
match for fear of destroying their wagons, were first made by Roman
war chariots. Since the chariots were made for or by Imperial Rome,
they were all alike in the matter of wheel spacing.
Thus, we have the answer to the original questions. The United States
standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches derives from the
original specification for an Imperial Roman army war chariot.
Specs and Bureaucracies live forever.
So, the next time you are handed a specification and wonder what
(horse's @#%) came up with it, you may be exactly right. Because
the Imperial Roman chariots were made to be just wide enough to
accommodate the back-ends of two war horses.

Plus: There's an interesting extension of the story about railroad
gauge and horses' behinds.
When we see a Space Shuttle sitting on the launch pad, there are
two big booster rockets attached to the sides of the main fuel tank.
These are the solid rocket boosters, or SRBs. The SRBs are made by
Thiokol at a factory in Utah.
The engineers who designed the SRBs might have preferred to make
them a bit fatter, but the SRBs had to be shipped by train from the
factory to the launch site. The railroad line to the factory runs
through a tunnel in the mountains.
The SRBs had to fit through that tunnel. The tunnel is slightly wider
than a railroad track, and the railroad track is about as wide as two
horses' behinds. So a major design feature of what is arguably the
world's most advanced transportation system was determined by the
width of a horse's backside.
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8.
tinvn303
Outline for today

1) Basic information on the RUP iterative development lifecycle model

2) Each team will update the class
in an informal presentation
(no need for polished slides),
using the following outline:
a. What progress has most
   recently been made on the project.
b. Current status of the project.
c. Issues and questions that
   need to be resolved.
d. What you plan to do on the
   project in time for next class.

3) Project work session

4) EACH TEAM EMAILS ME WITH
WHAT WAS DISCUSSED,
ACCOMPLISHED,
AND/OR REMAINS AN
UNRESOLVED PROBLEM
DURING THE WORK SESSION

------------------------------
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7. Lab work day #2
tinvn303
Plan for today's meeting

1) I will briefly step us through the
syllabus of a software engineering class
and find out what topics
you are interested in hearing
about briefly this semester.

2) Each team will update the class
in an informal presentation
(no need for polished slides),
using the following outline:
   a. What progress has most
       recently been made on the project.
   b. Current status of the project.
   c. Issues and questions that
       need to be resolved.
   d. What you plan to do on the
       project in time for next class.

3) Project work session

4) EACH TEAM EMAILS ME WITH
    WHAT WAS DISCUSSED,
    ACCOMPLISHED,
    AND/OR REMAINS AN
    UNRESOLVED PROBLEM
    DURING THE WORK SESSION

------------------------------------
Here is part of the syllabus of a
     software engineering &
     systems analysis
course

Let's step through it
    - what topics would like to know more about
    - for future meetings of this course

Part 2 of course: The Unified Process (UP)

2/15/10

Monday

·   Research on mutation analysis (15 min. and 40 min. versions)

·   A review of OO analysis and design; survey (ser. #7)

2/22/10

Monday

·   A review of the Unified Process; Schach’s temperate fruit system example (ser. # 9)

·   Case study, inception, and requirements (ser. # 10)

3/1/10

Monday

· From inception to elaboration

·   Use case modeling I (ser. #11)

3/8/10

Monday

·   More on Use case modeling I (ser. #11)

· Use cases II: granularity, EBPs, style

· Modeling procedure (preview)

3/15/10

Monday

· Modeling procedure

· Other requirements

· Supplemental: Use case modeling 3

3/22/10

Monday

·   Spring break, no class

3/29/10

Monday

· Analysis (domain) models - introduction

·   More on domain models

Part 3 of course: non-UP analysis methods (based on Schach book)

4/5/10

Monday

·   Waterfall, Unified Process, Spiral Models, and Project Failure (ser. # 22 & see spiral-background…htm and spiral-Jones….pdf)

·   Project planning: decomposability

4/12/10

Monday

·   SPMPs; how number of people affects things (ser. #20)

·   Read An initial note on specifications (ser. #15)

·   The problem of good specifications (ser. #15)

4/19/10

Monday

·   Specifications techniques (historical note: don’t do this old HOMEWORK ,  ser. =#15)

·   Data Flow Diagrams

4/26/10

Monday

·   PERT diagrams, Gantt Charts, & etc. (ser. #21)

·   Some research on PERT

·   Workflow diagrams

·   Three classic software project failures (see also Information systems “horror stories,” such as the Therac,Mars orbiter, Y2K bug and Conficker worm cases; POS problems; personal anecdotes, the myth of invulnerability (we’ve muddled thru before so we will again), and the AI singularity. Also  Ariane 5 and Patriot Missile failures; a long list of software failures; wikipedia article on software disasters,  and the "Stars" system case


---------------------------------------------------------

Continuing with #2...

2) Each team will update the class in an informal presentation (no need for polished slides), using the following outline:
a. What progress has most recently been made on the project.
b. Current status of the project.
c. Issues and questions that need to be resolved.
d. What you plan to do on the project in time for next class.

3) Project work session

4) EACH TEAM EMAILS ME WITH WHAT WAS DISCUSSED, ACCOMPLISHED, AND/OR REMAINS AN UNRESOLVED PROBLEM DURING THE WORK SESSION

6. Lab work day, with notes on Brooks
tinvn303
A few slides on F. Brooks' The Mythical Man-Month

A classic on software engineering

So old it uses "man-month" instead of "person-month"

Image





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nondecomposable




Each team updates the class in an informal presentation (no need for polished slides), using the following outline:

a. What progress has most recently been made on the project.

b. Current status of the project.

c. Things that need to be done soon on the project.

d. Issues and questions that need to be resolved.

e. What you plan to do on the project in time for next class.





PROJECT WORK SESSION

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